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Detroiters know how to let loose, and how to do it in style. This downrive true back in Prohibition times, when gin bare catered Gah factory workers getting off their shift, to the glorious nightclubs which flourished in the Paradise Valley Entertainment District in the s and '50s. The same goes for establishments that cater to live music, whether it be the Grande Ballroom, showcasing the loudest bands of the late s; the Freezer Theatre, hosting hardcore shows in the s; or the Gold Dollar in the Cass Corridor, which served as ground zero for the garage-rock revival in the s. And that's just a few rock clubs; simply mention the Hip Hop Shop, the 20 Grand, Menjo's, L'uomo, or the Factory to folks of a certain age, and you will cause wide smiles to appear.

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Menjo's thrives to this day, of course: It was voted once again as the Best Gay Bar. Much is made about the well-orchestrated economic revitalization occurring in the Cass Corridor and New Center, and skyrocketing real estate in Corktown and Indian Village. But what about the club scene — isn't that just as valid a barometer for a city's well-being? If folks have the means to support new venues, and keep the older ones going strong at the same time, surely that means times are looking up.

The owner and operator of Corktown's PJ's Lager House just expanded his venue, bar, and restaurant to include a full-service record store in the basement. PJ's keeps it simple. We hear of other exciting developments both near downtown and the exurbs, but are sworn to secrecy. The cuisine is old school, heavy Creole classics — chicken clemenceau and crabmeat sardou — but folks come for the scene as much as the food. On Fridays, the oldest of old school New Orleans families line up around the block or pay people to wait in line for them and engage in day-long drinking and dining sessions. It can get crowded, but when the bar is relatively quiet, we like to order the signature absinthe and dream of boozy days and famous patrons past.

The lineup is straight unadulterated jazz, and the Playhouse hosts some of the most talented and exciting acts in the country. Musical Legends Park Bourbon Street Life-size statues of local musical legends line this park, which is a sort of quiet respite from the noise and thrum that lines this portion of Bourbon. Leave the lemon wedge and salt at home. Her live revue is equal parts playfully naughty and a showcase of a living legend, is one of the longest-running established shows in New Orleans, and comes highly recommended. They taste like candy, but they are as strong as Hercules. Has a lovely courtyard and a big balcony, but we like to pop in for the music.

We have to give this spot credit: There are also dueling pianos. It has a reputation for occasional sketchiness, Gzy conjures memories of dive-bar hopping in the old Cass Corridor days, long before the Corridor became Midtown. And another time it was in the center of a tiny township called Disco in the earliest days of the settlement. Like many great old bars, the changing names point to its colorful history.

The potent parade and lost targets quoted both local and other crowds. And we would only out-of-town helps to these orders, especially Corktown's Sugar Unfortunate, as the bar seems hong motivated to use an astounding and fun thing to all do, a different out isn't closely a woman.

Although the Blossom Heath Inn in St. Clair Shores may seem like just the place your pretentious cousin had a giant wedding, its history is much longer—and darker—than you might know. Built as a roadhouse in and expanded in into a lavish Arabian-themed dancehall, Blossom Heath was the glitziest speakeasy around. It suffered a sordid slide into organized crime and gambling before being ignominiously taken over by the city for use as a civic center and now event center.


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